Category Archives: security

No Worthy mechs

I just built another little gateway pi, on Raspbian. It is a newer Raspbian than I used for the others. And newer is better, right? But when the little fellow came up, postfix claimed it couldn’t relay through tarragon, because it couldn’t accomplish login. Sasl authentication failed, no worthy mechs.

I remember good old “no worthy mechs” from way back when, always thought it a very cool error message. But why in the heck am I getting this? I’m not doing anything fancy.

I had a vague nagging feeling from some old Fedora problems, long ago. Could it be that I have to install some kind of sasl library, even to do plain authentication? Poked around a little. Eventually did an apt install libsasl2-modules and sasl2-bin. Sure enough, they actually installed.

And afterwords postfix came up and send the mail out of the queue. I’ll be dipped in … I am surprised. This was not something I had to do before. Is this an improvement in Raspbian. Don’t package any sasl mechs, make the poor sod figure out why sasl authentication won’t work.

This is to help me remember the next time this happens.

Re-signing Openssh Certificates

Seldom do I get to write a post where I am offering information which might not actually be out there in a lot of places. I could not find this information on the web, and had to figure it out myself, by reading the code, and doing experiments.

I talked in the last post about the need to re-issue all the openssh certificates, in order to update the hash algorithm used for the signatures. My way of maintaining the certificates, in my repository, would make it easy for the signing box to get all the existing certificates, but not (directly) the public keys that are inside those certificates.

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SSH Certificate signing

I’ve encountered a problem migrating from Fedora to Arch which ends up being about ssh and openssh certificates. I look back and discover that I never posted anything about my movement toward openssh certificates. Curious because I wrote a lengthy document about it (because of my leaky brain – not because I am any kind of authority on it).

I will probably go back and write a post about it, and back date it. But now a problem has arisen. Rather than explain, let the boys at openssh speak for themselves, in the release notes for openssh 8.2:

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Apache certificate chains

When I switched my main server to CentOS, described in an earlier post, one of the big pains was that I had to use CentOS 7, and there was a lot of software which had come a long way since CentOS 7, and I had to upgrade a log of things from upstream to get functionality that I had grown reliant upon.

I didn’t realize that Apache itself was one of those things that was sufficiently backwards in CentOS 7 that I would have trouble.

Ever since I move the server to CentOSdid that “upgrade”, I’ve been struggling with problems with the certificates not being honored. For the last few days I have been working pretty diligently to try to figure out this nagging problem, and today I finally figured it out. It is owing to an old Apache.

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Odd VPN Problem

I have had trouble twice now with modifying a working vpn configuration, and then being unable to get it to start. Both times I never actually solved it, so much as eliminating the problem by switching to a different nordvpn config file.

There was a penetration at nordvpn in which some passwords and userinfo were leaked. I wanted to change my password, and did, and had to get into the vpn router and change it there. And after I did the vpn just would not start. Eventually, I switched to another vpn endpoint, put in a new .conf file in /etc/openvpn/client and it came right up.

I don’t know what this is about.

Clamd signatures and Apache memory

After implementing the new tarragon the biggest problem I had involved the clamav package, and its loading of signatures. If clamd doesn’t come up and open its socket, then amavisd (the daemon who is consulted by postfix to handle all the checking of each piece of mail on input and output) will fail (assuming he is configured to do virus checking), This results in various problems. Amavis will mark the mail as “unchecked”, but worse, it will report failure back to postfix who gets confused and very often the message is delivered two or three times.

Clamd, the clamav daemon, now has over 6 million signatures. There are a lot of bad boys out there. The signatures are loaded by clamd from its database (in /var/lib/clamav) on startup, into memory. As a result, clamd has a large memory footprint, almost 800Mb on my system. The first issue, discovered before going live, was that systemd’s default parameters expect any daemon he starts to load within 90 seconds. If it fails to check in within that time, systemd considers it broken and terminates it. Clamd takes at least 3 minutes to load. I had to set a special TimeoutStartSec value in the systemd service script for clamd@.service.

Whew! I thought, boy I’m glad I figured that out. Hah!

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Setting up a mac remotely

I want to be able to get to my wife’s mac, in another city. She is an unsophisticated user, and I’d like to be able to help her when she needs help, but I can’t ask her to do very much setup. I also want to be able to provide backup for her files.

The first step was to outfit her with one of the little gateway pis previously described. Once that was done, we managed, together, to enable me to get to her mac with ssh, by way of the pi tunnel. And we managed to set up an account on her mac under my name.

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Gateway pi

I realized as I was writing a new post that I had never documented the gateway pi undertaking.

This started when a friend in the mountains got a new internet service where the ISP would not allow him (and therefore me) access to his router. As a result I could no longer use ssh to connect to his systems.

I solved this problem by setting his systems up to use a tool called autossh, with which I could have his system start, monitor, and keep running an ssh daemon with reverse tunnels open to my system. I could then reach him by attaching through the reverse tunnels.

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Adding a VPN Router to the network

The topology for the handling of downloads of stuff via a vpn previously involved a vpn client directly on rosemary. The problem with this was that sometimes the vpn would fail – it would get disconnected from the remote end. If I didn’t realize this, and started a download, it would be in the clear.

I thought a better solution was to have a separate router (herein the “vpn” router) between rosemary and the external router, and to have that router establish a constant vpn through it’s wan interface, through the external router. Everything that connected to a lan port on the vpn router would be protected. Rosemary would then use the vpn router as its path to the internet. Everything that rosemary sends or receives from the internet would come exclusively through the vpn router.

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Setting Up Openvpn Server

The objective of this project was to install a vpn server on one of the boxes in the cloud (initially asafoetida, then moved to tarragon), in order to provide a VPN server service for a friend who was traveling. My friend uses the name Darrell for his client, so in what follows the vpn is called by this name.

Create a Certificate Authority

A lot of the instructions, even from openvpn site, say to use the “easyrsa” package to generate the certificates for openvpn. This package seems to be put out by the openvpn boys, or at least with their cooperation. But I didn’t do that. I created a ca with raw openssl.

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