Category Archives: fedora

Desktop Files

For a very goofy reason involving a bug with composer, and new warning messages in PHP, I decided I needed to reinstall eclipse on oregano. Reinstalling eclipse is always a test of my patience. During the entire course of my life I do not believe that the installation of eclipse along with the various components I need, especially subclipse, has ever “just worked”. There is always some issue. So, of course, I do not look forward to it with gleeful anticipation.

I think part of the problem for me – a problem of my own making I suppose – is that I mostly use distros (Fedora and Ubuntu) in which the packagers have already arranged for tools like eclipse to appear as “system level” rather than “user level” tools. By this I mean they appear (or are symlinked from) /usr/bin, their configuration files are located it /etc, their icons appear when you search for apps, etc. Whereas if you just use the upstream installers the installation will be carried out at the user level, they will ask you where to put the binary, and they will put configuration files in ~/.config,

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Clamd signatures and Apache memory

After implementing the new tarragon the biggest problem I had involved the clamav package, and its loading of signatures. If clamd doesn’t come up and open its socket, then amavisd (the daemon who is consulted by postfix to handle all the checking of each piece of mail on input and output) will fail (assuming he is configured to do virus checking), This results in various problems. Amavis will mark the mail as “unchecked”, but worse, it will report failure back to postfix who gets confused and very often the message is delivered two or three times.

Clamd, the clamav daemon, now has over 6 million signatures. There are a lot of bad boys out there. The signatures are loaded by clamd from its database (in /var/lib/clamav) on startup, into memory. As a result, clamd has a large memory footprint, almost 800Mb on my system. The first issue, discovered before going live, was that systemd’s default parameters expect any daemon he starts to load within 90 seconds. If it fails to check in within that time, systemd considers it broken and terminates it. Clamd takes at least 3 minutes to load. I had to set a special TimeoutStartSec value in the systemd service script for clamd@.service.

Whew! I thought, boy I’m glad I figured that out. Hah!

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Tarragon Rebuild 2019

This server, on Amazon, hosts my website and a dozen others, provides mail service for several people’s email including my own with postfix, dovecot, opendkim, amavis, spamassassin and clamd, provides contacts and calendar service using radicale, provides vpn service with openvpn, provides a tor relay, provides nextcloud service, and hosts my svn repository.

The server was last rebuilt in 2017. Long, long ago when I built the first version of it, I was most familiar with Red Hat/Fedora, and since then it has been easiest just to upgrade it with Fedora, always grumbling to myself that someday I’m going to change it. The problem with being on Fedora, of course, is that Fedora changes every 6 months, so I’m constantly behind. And after a year I’m at end of life. This is dumb for a server that I don’t want to be messing with all the time.

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Forcing Monitor resolution

Cinnamon and Rosemary are now both happily rack-mounted in the basement (where it is cool, and where their many disk drives and fans can make as much racket as they wish).

Mostly I control them from the office with ssh and or vnc, but once in a while I need to actually be down there. My neighbor gave me a monitor, I have plenty of mice and keyboards, so I hooked up a KVM switch on the two of them so I didn’t have to keep getting behind the rack to move the monitor.

But alas, neither of them picked up the resolution of the monitor, I suppose (not sure) that with the KVM in the middle, they can’t really read the EDID and such stuff from the monitor. And since it is an “unknown” monitor, the display panel only shows 1024×768, 800×600 etc. The monitor itself helpfully tells me that it wants to be 1440×900 @60Hz.

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Root Account is locked

A few months ago Fedora crashed, and wouldn’t boot. It seems to do that from time to time. I have about had it with Fedora. I have at least three times as much trouble with Fedora as I do with Ubuntu.

So I reinstalled Fedora. I was back-level anyway, as I have grown very cautious of their automatic update – which about a third of the time ends up requiring a full system rebuild. My thinking about it wasn’t quite this black and white, but might has well have been: “It’s going to crash eventually, and require me to scrape it down to the bare metal – I might as well wait till that happens, rather than hastening the process by trying to update fedora.”

Anyway, on that occasion back in May, I rebuilt a new Fedora 30 system on a new disk, and restored everything.

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Setting Up Openvpn Server

The objective of this project was to install a vpn server on one of the boxes in the cloud (initially asafoetida, then moved to tarragon), in order to provide a VPN server service for a friend who was traveling. My friend uses the name Darrell for his client, so in what follows the vpn is called by this name.

Create a Certificate Authority

A lot of the instructions, even from openvpn site, say to use the “easyrsa” package to generate the certificates for openvpn. This package seems to be put out by the openvpn boys, or at least with their cooperation. But I didn’t do that. I created a ca with raw openssl.

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Fedora Crash, again

Preparing to go off on my semi-annual visit east I was trying to ensure that the primary systems here that have encrypted root drives (oregano, cinnamon and rosemary) could each be rebooted from afar by attaching to a dropbear instance during the initramfs. See article on booting notes about that.

Somehow Oregano became unbootable. Again. It usually takes three or four hours of flailing around to figure out what little thing has caused it to point its casters to the sky. It takes only a little longer to just rebuild from scratch with the latest release.

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New Internal Network setup

Owing to the failure of oregano detailed in the last post, I have finally taken steps to clean up a long standing issue in my internal network, viz: that oregano, the primary development computer was offering essential network services which all the other boxes relied upon. When oregano was down, almost everything else suffered.

This problem dates back at least 20 years. In early days I began the practice of having my primary linux computer act as a firewall separating the rest of the network from the internet, and as the dhcp server. I won’t try to defend the practice – it was what I did; but it has made less and less sense over the years. Plus it had the very undesirable side effect that when that primary computer was down the other systems lost their dhcp server and their path to the net.

I had this generic Chinese openwrt router which I bought last year, for reasons passing understanding. I’d planned to replace the primary router with it, but that proved a bad plan. I decided to use this extra router to fill the role oregano had filled, of separating the internal and external networks.

So this router, named obelisk, performs dhcp and dns forwarding. Henceforth Oregano will be just another box on the internal network.

Automatic update of Fedora Fails

I tried doing an update of fedora the other day, with the dnf system upgrade business, to upgrade in place. I should have known better. The failure is almost certainly related to the ongoing frustration of the graphics card.

One is offered the choice of two nice poisons. One may elect to use the open source nouveau driver, in which case the graphics driver will spontaneously crash about once a week forcing a reboot. Or, alternatively, one may choose instead to install the proprietary nvidia driver, in which case every few months one will get a new kernel that invalidates the driver, and the machine will suddenly not boot at all, requiring that you get in and fool around with grub and intitramfs until you can get it up enough to download and rebuild a new nvidia driver. Continue reading Automatic update of Fedora Fails